la voragine jose eustasio rivera by Angeles Brand on Prezi la voragine jose eustasio rivera by Angeles Brand on Prezi

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The Vortex, a kind of romantic allegory, was also a novel of protest.

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It was the first realistic description by a Colombian of the cowherders of the plains and the jungle rubber workers.

Its publication in assured Rivera lasting fame throughout the hemisphere and beyond, and it was translated into English, French, German, and Russian. In he enrolled at the Faculty of Law and Political Sciences of National University, graduating as a lawyer in During a period of convalescence he wrote La voragine The Vortexone of the greatest Latin American novels.

Rivera attempted to arouse humanitarian feelings concerning the exploitation of these people, and he reflected a cultured urban gentleman's frightened vision of the barbarism foisted on them.

Career After a failed attempt to be elected for the senate, he was appointed Legal Secretary of the Colombo-Venezuelan Border Commission to determine the limits with Venezuela, there he had the opportunity to travel through the Colombian jungles, rivers, and mountains, giving him a first hand experience of the subjects he would later write.

Born in the southern Colombian town of Neiva, Jose Eustacio Rivera came from a provincial family of modest means. The Vortex, a work romantic in spirit and poetic in style, strongly suggests that the veneer of civilization is thin. He also authored one collection of poetry, Tierra de promisionand a volume of sonnets and at his death left an unpublished drama in verse.

Disappointed with the lack of resources offered by his government for his trip, he abandoned the commission and continued travelling on his own. He also published several articles in newspapers in Colombia.

He later rejoined the commission, but before that he went to Brazil, where he became acquainted with the work of important Brazilian writers of his time, particularly Euclides da Cunha.

Arturo Cova, the protagonist of the novel, is an urban man of letters who, forced to flee from Bogota, encounters the brutal reality of life in the rural areas. Rivera attempted to arouse humanitarian feelings concerning the exploitation of these people, and he reflected a cultured urban gentleman's frightened vision of the barbarism foisted on them.

In publicizing the condition of the workers and their degradation at the hands of Colombian and European adventurers, Rivera provides an impassioned image of decay, death, and violence.

For several years Rivera combined a law practice with modest literary activities and became a recognized member of Bogota's urban intelligentsia.

After becoming one of the first graduates of the recently organized teachers' college, he took a degree in law.